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Residential Philosophy

Students in Eastern University dormMuch of the maturing and learning that is part of the undergraduate student's experience involves confronting new ideas and different viewpoints. Progressive integration of ideas and theories that result from interaction with diverse ways of seeing life is foundational to a student's personal and intellectual development. The process of coming to a personal identity requires various experiences, which help the individual clarify interests, skills, attitudes, and beliefs and to come to a genuine sense of committment.

At Eastern, it is our goal to provide a residence hall environment that allows for experimentation with differing roles, choice within the context of alternatives, and meaningful achievement in a wide variety of activities. The university years often are associated with stress and anxiety, and we seek to provide the support that allows growth to occur even within the context of difficult life experiences.

Eastern University strives to be a true Christian community. As such, we value the principles of individual responsibility and freedom, within the context of a community, norms and standards. As a community, Eastern includes a wide range of persons from different cultural, racial, and socio-economic backgrounds. Within the context of such diversity, we purposefully strive to meet the social and spiritual needs of students by providing a sense of rootedness and belonging, a sense of affiliation with friends, and a relation to the larger community.  The communal character of Eastern is a powerful and positive dimension of Eastern's educational process.

To facilitate a varied residence life experience, Eastern houses students in suites, traditional residence hall living, and apartments with intentional efforts to encourage residents to experience life with others who are from different backgrounds and communities. 

Ref: Eastern University Student Handbook, p.13

University Housing

University Housing refers to any housing managed by Eastern University's Office of Student Development. This includes housing located on the St. Davids campus and elsewhere. University Housing is primarily designed and available for full-time, traditional undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). For all CAS students, residency is required, including room and board (meal plan) as long as space is available. First-year students are assigned housing by the Housing Office. Returning students are encouraged to enter the Housing Process each year of enrollment, to select a room and a roommate and to select a board (meal) plan. Returning students who fail to enter the Housing Process will be placed in a room by the Housing Office and billed for the housing deposit and for the room and a full board plan.

Students who fit into one of the categories for exclusion from the residency requirement as listed below may petition for an exception, in writing with supporting documents, to the Dean of Students:

  1. Living at home with family.
  2. Currently serving in the military reserves or previously served on active duty in the military.
  3. Attaining 23 years of age before the academic term of enrollment.

Why does Eastern University require residency for College of Arts and Sciences Students?

Eastern University has always been a residential campus. We invest in new buildings as our population grows. All students who entered Eastern in the Fall of 2006 and after are required to be resident students as long as space is available. That policy is on the deposit form that all students receive and return with their admissions acceptance and deposit.

Students who live in college managed housing communities (residence halls) experience greater personal, spiritual, and emotional growth, and are more engaged in college life overall.  This leads to better grades, more personal growth and an array of positive interpersonal skills that become valuable assets in later life in both jobs and the home (Kuh et al, 1991).

Ref: Kuh, G: Schuh, John H.; Whitt, Elizabeth J.; and associates, (1991) Involving Colleges, Jossey Bass, San Francisco.

Questions?

Contact the Coordinator of Housing

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