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International Students: Financial Information

In order for an international student to qualify for an F-1 visa, he or she must show the ability to pay for the both the academic costs of study, and for the cost of living in the U.S. In the process of international admissions for Eastern University, the student documents financial resources in number of ways, which may include a Statement of Financial Support, a financial aid award letter, legal affidavit with attached proof of assets, and/or a receipt of an advanced deposit made directly to Eastern University. Students seeking a J-1 visa because of government funding, must also show evidence of adequate financial support, and may also use the statement of support form.

International Student Grants and other Financial Aid
Eastern University does not offer any full tuition scholarships, and international students do not qualify for federal sources of aid because they are not U.S. citizens. An international student may qualify for one of the following forms of financial aid, and may ask the admissions counselor for more information: -International Student Grant -On-Campus Employment -Church Matching Grant -Ministerial Discount -Graduate Assistantship (graduate students) In addition, some banks offer student loans. International students can often apply for a loan if they have an American co-signer.

Calculating Expenses
The international student should calculate total expenses for study in the U.S. as a sum total of tuition, housing and other living expenses, books and fees, and a medical insurance policy. The student insurance policy is required for all first-year international students, both graduate and undergraduate, because there is no other way to get health services in the U.S. Public health services are virtually non-existent. An estimate of expenses is available to assist the international student in planning.

Campus Employment
The F-1 visa restricts employment to only two acceptable avenues: on-campus jobs and practical training. Many on-campus jobs require the student be eligible for Federal Work Study (FWS). The international student is not eligible for FWS because he/she is not a U.S. citizen. When looking for campus jobs, the international student should apply to those positions that say FWS preferred or those that do not require FWS. Practical training refers to curricular elements such as internships, clinical placements, or other types of field education. J-1 students may also work on-campus.

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